Travel Advisories
Issued by US Department of State

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Showing 181-200 of 212 items.
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181

Suriname

Exercise normal precautions in Suriname.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Suriname.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Suriname has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Suriname:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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182

Sweden

Exercise normal precautions when traveling to Sweden.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Sweden.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Sweden has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to Sweden:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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183

Switzerland

Exercise normal precautions in Switzerland.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Switzerland.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Switzerland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Switzerland:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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184

Syria

Do not travel to Syria due to terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, armed conflict, and risk of unjust detention.

Country Summary: The U.S. Embassy in Damascus suspended its operations in February 2012. The Czech Republic serves as the protecting power for the United States in Syria. The U.S. government is unable to provide any emergency services to U.S. citizens in Syria.

Syria has experienced active armed conflict since 2011. No part of Syria is safe from violence. Kidnappings by armed groups, unjust arrests and/or detentions, the use of chemical warfare, shelling, and aerial bombardment of civilian centers pose significant risk of death or serious injury. The destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities has also increased hardships inside the country.

The U.S. government particularly warns private U.S. citizens against traveling to Syria to engage in armed conflict. U.S. citizens who undertake such activity face extreme personal risks, including kidnapping by armed groups, unjust arrests, injury, or death. The U.S. government does not support this activity. Our ability to provide consular assistance to individuals who are injured or kidnapped, or to the families of individuals who die in the conflict, is extremely limited.

Protests and demonstrations are quelled by government forces through aggressive tactics and protestors, activists, and political dissenters are routinely detained without access to legal representation or communications with friends and family.

Terrorist groups are active in Syria. Parts of Syria have experienced recent increases in incidents of bombings, IEDs, and assassinations. Fighting on behalf of or providing other forms of support to designated terrorist organizations, including ISIS and al-Qaeda affiliates, can constitute the provision of material support for terrorism, which is a crime under U.S. law that can result in penalties including prison time and large fines.

There is an ongoing risk of kidnapping and detentions of U.S. citizens and Westerners throughout the country. U.S. citizens remain a target. U.S. citizens are also targets of abduction and/or unjust detention by the Syrian government and while in detention do not have access to due process or medical attention. Government detention centers are known to be unsanitary facilities where widespread cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment of detainees has been documented, as well as torture and extrajudicial killings. Minors, persons with physical, sensory, or mental disabilities, and elderly have frequently been victims of unjust detention. The Syrian government has also been implicated in the enforced or involuntary disappearance of more than 100,000 citizens, including medical and humanitarian workers, journalists, human rights activists, political opposition, and additionally those suspected of affiliation with these groups and their family members. Note: Only the Syrian government can issue a valid entry visa to Syria. Failure to obtain a legitimate entry visa directly from the Syrian government could result in detention.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Syria, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR), which says that heightened military activity associated with the Syrian conflict may result in the risk of GPS interference, communications jamming, and errant long-range surface to air missiles straying into adjacent airspace within 200 nautical miles of the Damascus Flight Information Region. These activities may inadvertently pose hazards to civil aviation transiting the region. It also has the potential to spill over into the adjacent airspace managed by neighboring states and eastern portions of the Mediterranean Sea.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Syria.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Syria has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Syria:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
  • Visit our website on Travel to High Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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185

Taiwan

Reconsider travel to Taiwan due to COVID-19-related restrictions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Taiwan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Taiwan has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Taiwan.

 If you decide to travel to Taiwan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information

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186

Tajikistan

Exercise increased caution in Tajikistan due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist organizations are known to have a presence in the region and have targeted foreigners and local authorities in recent years, including attacks on Western bicyclists in 2018 and a government border post in 2019.

Border Areas with Afghanistan

The current political situation in Afghanistan creates a challenging and unpredictable environment in the border areas due to evolving security conditions. The U.S. Embassy recommends that U.S. citizens reconsider travel near and along Tajikistan’s border with Afghanistan. U.S. citizens should remain alert and avoid activities that develop predictable patterns of movement. If documenting travel on social media, please ensure your privacy settings are appropriately set.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tajikistan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Tajikistan has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Tajikistan:

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

 

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187

Tanzania

Exercise increased caution in Tanzania due to crime, terrorism, and targeting of LGBTI persons.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania due to the threat of terrorism.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as assault, sexual assault, robberies, mugging, and carjacking, is common.  Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Terrorist groups could attack in Tanzania with little or no warning, targeting embassies, police stations, mosques, and other places frequented by Westerners. Please see the additional information below regarding the increased threat of terrorism in Mtwara Region.

Members of the LGBTI community have been arrested, targeted, harassed, and/or charged with unrelated offenses.  Individuals detained under suspicion of same-sex sexual conduct could be subject to forced anal examinations.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tanzania.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Tanzania has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Tanzania:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa and keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not leave your food or drink unattended.
  • Stay alert in all locations, especially those frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid public displays of affection particularly between same-sex couples.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Tanzania.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

There have been reports of violence in Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania. Increased activity by extremists along the southern border has led to attacks against both government and civilian targets.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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188

Thailand

Exercise normal precautions in Thailand. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla provinces due to civil unrest.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Thailand.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Thailand has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Thailand:

Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla Provinces – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Periodic violence directed mostly at Thai government interests by a domestic insurgency continues to affect security in the southernmost provinces of Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat, and Songkhla. U.S. citizens are at risk of death or injury due to the possibility of indiscriminate attacks in public places. Martial law is in force in this region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these provinces as U.S government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these provinces.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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189

The Bahamas

Exercise increased caution in The Bahamas due to crime

Country Summary: The vast majority of crime occurs on New Providence (Nassau) and Grand Bahama (Freeport) islands.  In Nassau, exercise caution in the “Over the Hill” area (south of Shirley Street). Violent crime, such as burglaries, armed robberies, and sexual assault occur, but generally not in tourist areas. Activities involving commercial recreational watercraft, including water tours, are not consistently regulated.  Watercraft are often not maintained, and many companies do not have safety certifications to operate in The Bahamas. Jet-ski operators have been known to commit sexual assaults against tourists. As a result, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to use independently operated jet-ski rentals on New Providence and Paradise Islands. 

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to The Bahamas.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined The Bahamas has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to The Bahamas: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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190

The Gambia

Exercise normal precautions in The Gambia. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire travel advisory.

Exercise Increased Caution in:

  • The Gambia’s southern border area adjacent to Senegal’s Casamance region due to the potential presence of landmines.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to The Gambia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined The Gambia has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to The Gambia:

The Gambia’s Southern Border with Senegal – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Some landmines from the Casamance conflict remain in the border region.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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191

Timor-Leste

Exercise increased caution in Timor-Leste due to crime and civil unrest.

Country Summary: Timor-Leste has seen isolated instances of police responding to protests with force and the use of tear gas. Stone throwing attacks on vehicles can occur during gang conflicts and periods of unrest. Gender-based violence is high in Timor-Leste, and sexual harassment is fairly common.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Timor-Leste.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Timor-Leste has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Timor-Leste:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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192

Togo

Exercise normal precautions in Togo.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider Travel to:

  • Northern border region adjacent to Burkina Faso due to potential for terrorism and kidnapping.

Exercise Increased Caution in:

  • Areas north of Kande due to potential for terrorism.
  • The cities of Sokodé, Bafilo, and Mango due to civil unrest.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Togo.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Togo has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Togo:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy in Togo on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Togo.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Northern Border Region – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Extremist groups have carried out attacks, including kidnapping, in adjacent areas of Burkina Faso, and Benin.  Attacks may occur with little or no warning.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in areas north and northeast of the city of Dapaong as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these areas.

North of Kande – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Extremist groups have carried out attacks in nearby areas of Benin. Attacks may occur with little or no warning.

The Cities of Sokodé, Bafilo, and Mango – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

There is a history of violent demonstrations in Sokodé, Bafilo, and Mango, during which protesters and security force members have been injured, and some killed.  Police have used tear gas to disperse demonstrations that caused traffic disruptions in city centers and along National Route 1, and arrested demonstrators.  Security forces have at times used excessive force to disperse crowds. Authorities have interrupted internet and cellular data services during past protests, making communication difficult and unpredictable.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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193

Tonga

Do not travel to Tonga due to recent volcanic eruptions. Reconsider travel to Tonga due to COVID-19-related restrictions.

Country Summary: On January 15, 2022, a partially underwater volcano in Tonga erupted. The CDC has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice due to heavy ashfall, which caused significant damage across the island. In addition, the eruption led to tsunamis (a series of enormous waves created by an underwater disturbance), causing further damage in Tonga and affecting other destinations in the South Pacific. 

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tonga.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Tonga has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. Commercial transportation to/from Tonga is not available or only sporadically available.  It may be difficult to enter or leave the country, and travelers should expect delays entering Tonga and/or returning to the United States. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Tonga. 

If you decide to travel to Tonga:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information

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194

Trinidad and Tobago

Exercise increased caution in Trinidad and Tobago due to crime, terrorism, and kidnapping.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Laventille, Beetham, Sea Lots, Cocorite, and the interior of Queen's Park Savannah in Port of Spain due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as murder, robbery, assault, sexual assault, home invasion, and kidnapping, is common.

Gang activity, such as narcotics trafficking, is common. A significant portion of violent crime is gang-related.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Trinidad and Tobago.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Trinidad and Tobago has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Trinidad and Tobago:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display overt signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting ATMs.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Port of Spain – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of Port of Spain.

U.S. government personnel are prohibited from travelling to the following areas:  Laventille, Beetham, Sea Lots, Cocorite, and the interior of Queens’ Park Savannah.  After dark, U.S. government personnel are prohibited from travelling to downtown Port of Spain, Fort George overlook, and all beaches.  

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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195

Tunisia

Exercise increased caution in Tunisia due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Within 30 km of southeastern Tunisia along the border with Libya due to terrorism.
  • Mountainous areas in the country’s west, including the Chaambi Mountain National Park area, due to terrorism.
  • The desert south of Remada due to the military zone.
  • Jendouba south of Ain Drahem and west of RN15, El Kef, and Kasserine, next to the Algerian border due to terrorism.
  • Sidi Bou Zid in central Tunisia due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Tunisia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, museums, resorts, hotels, festivals, nightclubs, restaurants, religious sites, markets/shopping malls, government facilities and security forces. A country-wide state of emergency, which grants security forces more authority to maintain civil order and enables the government to focus on combating terrorism, is in effect.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in some areas of Tunisia. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside greater Tunis.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tunisia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Tunisia has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Tunisia:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel and see the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Exercise caution when using public transportation, due to safety and security concerns.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Avoid staying overnight outside of the main cities and tourist locations.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy in Tunisia on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Tunisia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Border with Libya – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Developments in Libya continue to affect the security situation along the Tunisian-Libyan border in areas such as Ras Jedir and Dehiba along with the cities of Ben Guerdan and Medenine. The border with Libya is frequently closed to all traffic with short notice for extended periods. The Department of State advises U.S. citizens not to travel to Libya.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Western Mountains and Chaambi Mountain National Park – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist groups continue to operate in mountains of Western Tunisia.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

The Desert South of Remada – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The desert south of Remada is designated as a military zone by the Government of Tunisia. Special authorization is required for travelers wishing to enter the military zone.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Jendouba El Kef and Kasserine near the Algerian Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist groups continue to operate in these areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sidi Bou Zid in Central Tunisia – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist groups continue to operate in this area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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196

Turkey

Exercise increased caution when traveling to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Sirnak province, Hakkari province, and any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian border due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, for alleged affiliations with terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey. Participation in demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey, as well as criticism of the government (including on social media) can result in arrest.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Turkey.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Turkey has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Turkey:

Sirnak Province, Hakkari Province, and Any Arewithin six miles (ten kilometers) of the Syrian Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Sirnak province, Hakkari province, or any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups, armed conflict, and civil unrest. Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, and improvised explosive devices, as well as shootings, and illegal roadblocks leading to violence have occurred in these areas. U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to these provinces and to any area within six miles (ten kilometers) of the Turkey/Syria border without prior approval.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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197

Turkmenistan

Reconsider travel to Turkmenistan due to Embassy Ashgabat’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens, and COVID-19-related restrictions.

Country Summary: Currently, international commercial flights are suspended.  Charter flights are infrequent and often operate out of cities that are located hundreds of miles from Ashgabat.

Please read the country information page for additional information on travel to Turkmenistan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Turkmenistan has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. Commercial transportation to and from Turkmenistan is not available or only sporadically available. It may be difficult to enter and leave Turkmenistan and travelers should expect delays entering Turkmenistan and returning to the United States.

If you decide to travel to Turkmenistan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health and travel information.

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198

Turks and Caicos Islands

Exercise increased caution in the Turks and Caicos Islands due to crime

Country Summary: The vast majority of crime occurs in Providenciales. Local medical care and criminal investigative capabilities are limited.                                            

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Turks and Caicos Islands.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Turks and Caicos Islands have a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the Turks and Caicos Islands:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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199

Tuvalu

Reconsider travel to Tuvalu due to COVID-19-related restrictions

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tuvalu.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Tuvalu has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. Commercial transportation to/from Tuvalu is not available or only sporadically available.  It may be difficult to enter or leave the country, and travelers should expect delays entering Tuvalu and/or returning to the United States. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Tuvalu. 

If you decide to travel to Tuvalu:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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200

Uganda

Reconsider travel to Uganda due to crime and terrorism.

Country summary: Terrorist groups active in Uganda have claimed responsibility for recent bombings in and near Kampala.  While the attacks do not appear to have targeted foreigners, anyone can be a victim of acts of violence.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, home invasion, and sexual assault, can occur at any time, especially in larger cities including Kampala and Entebbe.  Local police may lack appropriate resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Uganda.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Uganda has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Uganda:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Food and drinks should never be left unattended in public especially in local clubs.
  • Remain with a group of friends in public.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Uganda.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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