Travel Advisories
Issued by US Department of State

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Showing 201-212 of 212 items.
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201

Ukraine

Do not travel to Ukraine due to Russian military invasion and COVID-19. U.S. citizens in Ukraine should depart immediately if it is safe to do so using any commercial or other privately available ground transportation options. U.S. citizens should not travel to Ukraine due to the active armed conflict and the singling out of U.S. citizens in Ukraine by Russian government security officials. All U.S. citizens should carefully monitor U.S. government notices and local and international media outlets for information about changing security conditions and alerts to shelter in place. Those remaining in Ukraine should exercise increased caution due to the potential for active combat, crime, and civil unrest. Read the entire Travel Advisory.  

U.S. citizens in Ukraine should depart immediately if it is safe to do so using any commercial or other privately available ground transportation options. U.S. citizens should not travel to Ukraine due to the active armed conflict and the singling out of U.S. citizens in Ukraine by Russian government security officials. All U.S. citizens should carefully monitor U.S. government notices and local and international media outlets for information about changing security conditions and alerts to shelter in place. Those remaining in Ukraine should exercise increased caution due to the potential for active combat, crime, and civil unrest. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

The security situation throughout Ukraine is highly volatile and conditions have deteriorated. U.S. citizens should remain vigilant and take appropriate steps to increase their security awareness. There are continued reports of U.S. citizens being singled out and detained by the Russian military in Ukraine and when evacuating by land through Russia-occupied territory or to Russia or Belarus. Know the location of your closest shelter or protected space. In the event of mortar or rocket fire, follow the instructions from local authorities and seek shelter immediately. If you feel your current location is no longer safe, you should carefully assess the potential risks involved in moving to a different location.

The U.S. Department of State suspended operations at U.S. Embassy Kyiv, effective February 28. All in-person consular services in Ukraine are suspended until further notice.

U.S. citizens seeking emergency assistance and those who decide to remain in Ukraine should complete this online form and the State Department will respond. The U.S. government will not be able to evacuate U.S. citizens from Ukraine. Please review what the U.S. government can and cannot do to assist you in a crisis overseas. U.S. citizens may seek consular services, including requests for repatriation loans, passports, and visa services, at U.S. embassies and consulates in neighboring countries.

On February 24, the Ukrainian government declared a state of emergency. Each province (oblast) will decide on the measures to be implemented according to local conditions. Measures could include curfews, restrictions on the freedom of movement, ID verification, and increased security inspections, among other measures. Follow any state of emergency measures imposed in your oblast.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits U.S. civil aviation from flying in Ukrainian airspace. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices. Additionally, since February 24, when Russia’s forces began attacking major Ukrainian cities, the State Aviation Administration of Ukraine, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency, and the Federal Aviation Administration have prohibited flights into, out of, and over Ukraine due to ongoing military actions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Ukraine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ukraine has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

Travel to High-Risk Areas

If you are not currently in Ukraine but choose to disregard the travel advisory not to enter Ukraine, you should consider taking the following steps prior to travel: 

  • Visit our website on Travel to High-Risk areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them. 
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information. 
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist
  • Complete the online form for U.S. citizens in Ukraine.

If you are currently in Ukraine: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to the security situation and health information.

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202

United Arab Emirates

Reconsider travel to the United Arab Emirates due to the threat of missile or drone attacks.

Country Summary: The possibility of attacks affecting U.S. citizens and interests in the Gulf and Arabian Peninsula remains an ongoing, serious concern.  Rebel groups operating in Yemen have stated an intent to attack neighboring countries, including the UAE, using missiles and drones. Recent missile and drone attacks targeted populated areas and civilian infrastructure.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including the United Arab Emirates, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the United Arab Emirates.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the United Arab Emirates has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the United Arab Emirates:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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203

United Kingdom

Exercise increased caution in the United Kingdom due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in the United Kingdom. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

There is also a risk of isolated violence by dissident groups in Northern Ireland, focused primarily on police and military targets.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the United Kingdom.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the United Kingdom has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel and return to the United States.

If you decide to travel to the United Kingdom:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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204

Uruguay

Exercise increased caution in Uruguay due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as homicides, armed robberies, car jackings, and thefts occur throughout the country and in urban areas frequented by U.S. government personnel, day and night. Criminals commonly travel in pairs on motorcycles to approach unsuspecting victims with a weapon and demand personal belongings. Armed criminals also target grocery stores, restaurants, financial centers, and small businesses, in which innocent bystanders are often victimized.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Uruguay.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Uruguay has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Uruguay:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy's web page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Be aware of your surroundings especially when traveling to tourist locations or poorly lit areas.
  • Call 911 if you encounter a crime in progress. Do not physically resist any robbery attempt or try to stop a robbery in progress.
  • Be vigilant when visiting banks or using ATMs during non-daylight hours or in remote locations; criminals often target ATMs and businesses in the early morning hours.
  • Do not leave valuable objects in parked vehicles or in plain sight when driving.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive jewelry or watches.
  • Review your personal and residential security plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Uruguay.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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205

Uzbekistan

Exercise normal precautions in Uzbekistan. 

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Uzbekistan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Uzbekistan has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to Uzbekistan: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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206

Vanuatu

Reconsider travel to Vanuatu due to COVID-19-related restrictions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Vanuatu.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Vanuatu has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. Commercial transportation to/from Vanuatu is not available or only sporadically available. It may be difficult to enter or leave the country, and travelers should expect delays entering Vanuatu and/or returning to the United States. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Vanuatu.

If you decide to travel to Vanuatu:

 Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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207

Venezuela

Do not travel to Venezuela due to arrest and detention of U.S. citizens without due process or fair trial guarantees, or as a pretext for an illegitimate purpose; crime; civil unrest; poor health infrastructure; and kidnapping.

Country Summary:  On March 11, 2019, the U.S. Department of State announced the withdrawal of diplomatic personnel from U.S. Embassy Caracas.  All consular services, routine and emergency, are suspended until further notice.  The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Venezuela.  U.S. citizens in Venezuela who require consular services should try to leave the country as soon and as safely possible and contact a U.S. embassy or consulate in another country.

Violent crimes, such as homicide, armed robbery, kidnapping, and carjacking, are common.  Political rallies and demonstrations occur, often with little notice.  Demonstrations typically elicit a strong police and security force response that includes the use of tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets against participants and occasionally devolve into looting and vandalism. 2020 and 2021 United Nations Human Rights Council Fact-Finding Mission reports documented human rights abuses attributed to the Maduro regime, including torture, extrajudicial killings, forced disappearances, and detentions without due process and/or fair trial guarantees or as a pretext for an illegitimate purpose.  There are shortages of gasoline, food, electricity, water, medicine, and medical supplies throughout much of Venezuela.  The CDC issued a Level 3 ‘Avoid Nonessential Travel’ notice on September 30, 2020, due to inadequate healthcare and the breakdown of the medical infrastructure in Venezuela.

Regime-aligned security forces have detained U.S. citizens for long periods.  The Maduro regime does not notify the U.S. government of the detention of U.S. citizens and the U.S. government is not granted access to those U.S. citizens.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Venezuela, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR).  For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices. This flight prohibition can make emergency medical evacuation flights between the United States and Venezuela difficult or impractical.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Venezuela.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Venezuela has a unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Venezuela:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Venezuela Affairs Unit’s webpage for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Do not travel between cities after dark.
  • Avoid travel between Simón Bolívar International Airport and Caracas at night.
  • Do not take unregulated taxis from Simón Bolívar International Airport, and avoid ATMs in this area.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Bring a sufficient supply of over-the-counter and prescription medicines.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Venezuela.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Be prepared for an indefinite stay as there are limited international flights into or out of Venezuela and the Maduro regime has, at times, blocked U.S. persons’ access to departing flights.
  • Be prepared for the high risk of indefinite arbitrary detention on specious charges without consular access.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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208

Vietnam

Exercise normal precautions in Vietnam.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Vietnam.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Vietnam has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

 If you decide to travel to Vietnam:    

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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209

Worldwide Caution

This latest update to the Department of State’s Worldwide Caution provides U.S. citizens with general information regarding terrorist activities, political violence and criminal activity that transpire abroad, as well as specific recommendations on how to prepare for possible contingencies, receive information on breaking security events and ensure that travelers can be contacted in an emergency. This version replaces the Worldwide Caution dated July 2, 2018.

As terrorist attacks, political violence (including demonstrations), criminal activities and other security incidents often take place without any warning, U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to maintain a high level of vigilance and practice good situational awareness when traveling abroad. When planning a trip and prior to departing the United States, U.S. citizens should consult country specific Travel Advisories and information pages on travel.state.gov.

Travelers are also urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and to make it easier to locate you in an emergency. The Department uses these security messages to convey information about terrorist threats, security incidents, planned demonstrations, natural disasters, etc. In an emergency, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate or call the following numbers: 1 (888) 407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1 (202) 501-4444 from other countries.

U.S. government facilities worldwide actively monitor potential security threats and may temporarily close or periodically suspend public services to assess their security posture. In those instances, U.S. embassies and consulates will make every effort to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens abroad are urged to monitor the local news and maintain contact with the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate.

Terrorist groups including ISIS, al-Qa'ida, their associates, and those inspired by such organizations, are intent on attacking U.S. citizens wherever they are. Extremists may use conventional or non-conventional weapons to target U.S. government and private interests. Terrorists are increasingly using less sophisticated methods, including edged weapons, pistols and vehicles, as weapons to effectively target crowds. Extremists increasingly aim to identify and attack "soft" targets, such as:

  • high-profile public events (sporting contests, political rallies, demonstrations, holiday events, celebratory gatherings, etc.)
  • hotels, clubs and restaurants
  • places of worship
  • schools
  • parks
  • shopping malls and markets
  • tourism infrastructure and tourist sites
  • public transportation systems
  • airports

In multiple regions, terrorists, guerrilla groups and criminals seek to kidnap U.S. citizens to finance their operations or for political purposes. The Department also remains concerned that terrorists could again seek to down aircraft using concealed explosives or hijack commercial flights.

Private U.S. citizens should not travel to any country to participate in armed conflict. U.S. citizens are reminded that fighting on behalf of, or providing other forms of support to, designated terrorist organizations can constitute the provision of material support for terrorism, which is a serious crime that can result in penalties, including prison time and large fines. 

For further information:

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210

Yemen

Do not travel to Yemen due to terrorism, civil unrest, health risks, kidnapping, armed conflict, and landmines.

Country Summary: The U.S. Embassy in Sana’a suspended its operations in February 2015, and the U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Yemen.

A civil war continues in Yemen. In addition, terrorist groups continue to plot and conduct attacks in Yemen. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting public sites, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Additionally, there is a continuing threat of kidnapping/detention by terrorists, criminal elements, and/or non-government actors. Employees of western organizations may be targeted for attack or kidnapping.

Military conflict has caused significant destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities. This limits the availability of electricity, clean water, and medical care. This instability often hampers the ability of humanitarian organizations to deliver critically needed food, medicine, and water. Critical levels of violence, to include armed conflict, artillery shelling, and air strikes, persist throughout the country. There are also reports of landmines throughout Yemen.

Cholera is present throughout Yemen. There is a limited availability of medicine and medical supplies, and adequate medical treatment is unavailable.

There is a very high risk of kidnapping, and detention of U.S. citizens in Yemen, particularly dual national Yemeni-Americans. Rebel groups in Sana’a have detained U.S. citizens, including dual Yemeni-American citizens. U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, have faced difficulty – including lengthy delays – when attempting to depart Yemen.

Some companies outside of Yemen have misrepresented the security situation on the Yemeni island of Socotra and are offering tourist visits there, including by facilitating unofficial and invalid "visas." Only the sovereign Republic of Yemen Government can issue valid Yemeni visas. Private companies or third countries that arrange such visits are putting tourists in danger. U.S. citizens should not travel to Socotra or any other part of Yemen.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Yemen, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Yemen.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Yemen has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Yemen:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel. and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Yemen.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

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211

Zambia

Exercise normal precautions in Zambia. 

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Zambia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Zambia has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Zambia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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212

Zimbabwe

Exercise increased caution in Zimbabwe due to crime.           

Country Summary:  Violent crime, such as assault, carjacking, and home invasion, is common among residents known to have large sums of cash.  Smashing the windows of cars with the intent to steal is also common.

Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Zimbabwe.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Zimbabwe has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Zimbabwe:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Stay alert and avoid openly displaying cash.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Stay away from political rallies, demonstrations, and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Zimbabwe.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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