Travel Advisories
Issued by US Department of State

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Showing 41-60 of 212 items.
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41

Chad

Reconsider travel to Chad due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, and kidnapping.  Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • Lake Chad region due to terrorism.
  • Borders with Libya and Sudan due to armed conflict and minefields.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, and muggings, have occurred in Chad.

Demonstrations continue, particularly in N'Djamena, in the wake of recent armed insurrection and have the potential to turn violent.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreigners, local security forces, and civilians.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad as U.S. Government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of the capital.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Chad.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Chad has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Chad:

Lake Chad Region – Do Not Travel

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreigners, local security forces, and civilians. Terrorists can easily cross borders. Government security forces may restrict civilian movement and engage in military operations with limited warning.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad, particularly in the Lake Chad Basin.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Libya and Sudan Borders – Do Not Travel

Armed non-governmental groups operate in Libya and northern Chad.

There are unmapped and undocumented minefields along the borders with both Libya and Sudan.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad, particularly in border areas with Libya and Sudan.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with changes to health information.

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42

Chile

Exercise increased caution in Chile due to civil unrest.    

Country Summary: Large-scale demonstrations periodically occur in Santiago and other cities in Chile. Demonstrations can take place with little or no notice, and often result in disruptions to transportation, including service on public buses and the Santiago Metro.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Chile.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Chile has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Chile:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions and obey all curfews.
  • Find a safe location, and shelter in place if in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Monitor local media and local transportations sites (buses, Metro, and airport) for updates and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy and Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Chile.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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43

China

Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws and COVID-19-related restrictions. Do not travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), Jilin province, and Shanghai municipality due to COVID-19-related restrictions, including the risk of parents and children being separated. Reconsider travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong SAR due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

On April 11, 2022, the Department ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and all family members from the Consulate General Shanghai consular district due to a surge in COVID-19 cases and the impact of restrictions related to the PRC’s response.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the PRC has a low level of COVID-19 and a high level of COVID-19 for Hong Kong. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

The zero-tolerance approach to COVID-19 by the PRC and Hong Kong governments severely impacts travel and access to public services. All travelers should prepare to quarantine at a government-designated location for a minimum of 14 days upon arrival. While in quarantine, health authorities will test travelers as often as daily for COVID-19 and will not permit travelers to leave their rooms. Travelers who test positive during this quarantine time will be transferred to a government-designated medical or quarantine facility. Standards of care, accommodations, testing, and treatments may differ considerably from standards in the United States. Even after completing quarantine on-arrival, travelers to the PRC and Hong Kong may face additional quarantines and mandatory testing as well as movement and access restrictions, including access to medical services and public transportation. In some cases, children in Hong Kong and the PRC who test positive have been separated from their parents and kept in isolation until they meet local hospital discharge requirements.

Travelers within the PRC and Hong Kong may be subject to mandatory testing. In areas with confirmed COVID-19 cases, restrictions may include being confined to home or moved to a government- designated quarantine facility or hospital. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in the PRC, or the Consulate General Hong Kong's COVID-19 page for information on the COVID-19 situation in Hong Kong as testing and travel requirements frequently change.

Country Summary: The PRC government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including carrying out arbitrary and wrongful detentions and using exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries without due process of law. The PRC government uses arbitrary detention and exit bans to:

  • compel individuals to participate in PRC government investigations,
  • pressure family members to return to the PRC from abroad,
  • influence PRC authorities to resolve civil disputes in favor of PRC citizens, and
  • gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments.

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of an exit ban when they attempt to depart the PRC, and there is no reliable mechanism or legal process to find out how long the ban might continue or to contest it in a court of law.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.

Foreigners in the PRC, including but not limited to businesspeople, former foreign government personnel, and journalists from Western countries have been arbitrarily interrogated and detained by PRC officials for alleged violations of PRC national security laws. The PRC has also threatened, interrogated, detained, and expelled U.S. citizens living and working in the PRC.

Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC government.

The PRC government does not recognize dual nationality. U.S.-PRC citizens and U.S. citizens of Chinese heritage may be subject to additional scrutiny and harassment, and the PRC government may prevent the U.S. Embassy from providing consular services.

XINJIANG UYGHUR AUTONOMOUS REGION and TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice.

HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

Since the imposition of the National Security Law on June 30, 2020, the PRC unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power in the Hong Kong SAR. The PRC has demonstrated an intention to use this authority to target a broad range of activities it defines as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign entities. The National Security Law also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, which could subject U.S. citizens who have been publicly critical of the PRC to a heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution. PRC security forces, including the new Office for Safeguarding National Security, now operate in the Hong Kong SAR and are not subject to oversight by the Hong Kong judiciary.

Demonstrations: Participating in demonstrations or any other activities that authorities interpret as constituting an act of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion with a foreign country could result in criminal charges. On June 30, 2020, as part of its color-coded system of warning flags, the Hong Kong police unveiled a new purple flag, which warns protesters that shouting slogans or carrying banners with an intent prohibited by the law could now bring criminal charges. U.S. citizens are strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations.

Propaganda: A PRC propaganda campaign has falsely accused individuals, including U.S. citizens, of fomenting unrest in the Hong Kong SAR. In some cases, the campaign has published their personal information, resulting in threats of violence on social media.

Read the country information page for the PRC and the country information page for the Hong Kong SAR for additional information on travel.

If you decide to travel to the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, read the Embassy COVID-19 page for the PRC and the Consulate General COVID-19 page for the Hong Kong SAR for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, monitor local media, local transportations sites and apps like MTR Mobile or CitybusNWFB, and the Hong Kong International Airport website for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Avoid taking photographs of protesters or police without permission.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, review your Hong Kong flight status with your airline or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Enter the PRC on your U.S. passport with a valid PRC visa and keep it with you.
  • If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or the nearest consulate immediately.
  • If you plan to enter North Korea, read the North Korea Travel Advisory. Travelers should note that U.S. passports are not valid for travel to, in, or through North Korea, unless they are specially validated by the Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. Follow the U.S. Embassy on Twitter, WeChat, and Weibo. Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the PRC and the Hong Kong SAR.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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44

Colombia

Reconsider travel due to crime and terrorism. Exercise increased caution due to civil unrest and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • Arauca, Cauca (except Popayán), and Norte de Santander departments due to crime and terrorism.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as homicide, assault, and armed robbery, is widespread. Organized criminal activities, such as extortion, robbery, and kidnapping, are common in some areas.

On June 23, 2016, the Colombian government signed a peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). However, the National Liberation Army (ELN), Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia - People’s Army (FARC-EP), and Segunda Marquetalia terrorist organizations continue plotting attacks in Colombia, and may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, police stations, military facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas. While terrorists have not specifically targeted U.S. citizens, the attacks could result in unintended victims.

Demonstrations occur regularly throughout the country. Large public demonstrations can take place for a variety of political and economic issues. Demonstrations can cause the shutdown of local roads and major highways, often without prior notice or estimated reopening timelines. Road closures may significantly reduce access to public transportation and airports, and may disrupt travel both within and between cities. During nationwide protests earlier in 2021, several cities experienced vandalism, looting, and destruction. Some demonstrations have resulted in fatalities and injuries.

U.S. government personnel cannot travel freely throughout Colombia for security reasons.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Colombia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Colombia has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Colombia:

Arauca, Cauca, and Norte de Santander Departments – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, including armed robbery and homicide, is widespread.

Terrorist groups are active in some parts.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens as U.S. government-personnel travel to these areas is severely restricted due to security concerns.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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45

Comoros

Exercise normal precautions in Comoros.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Comoros.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Comoros has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

If you decide to travel to Comoros:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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46

Costa Rica

Exercise increased caution in Costa Rica due to crime.

Country Summary: While petty crime is the predominant threat for tourists in Costa Rica, violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault, occurs in Costa Rica. The Costa Rican government provides additional security resources in areas frequented by tourists.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Costa Rica.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Costa Rica has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Costa Rica:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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47

Cote d Ivoire

Reconsider travel to Cote d’Ivoire due to crime.  Exercise increased caution due to civil unrest and terrorism.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Northern border region due to terrorism.

Country Summary:  Crime continues to be a major public security concern in Côte d’Ivoire. Violent crime, such as carjacking, robbery, and home invasion, is common.  Local police often lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

Extremist activity occurs frequently in the tri-border region of Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, and Mali.

Due to ongoing political tensions, demonstrations and protests are likely to occur and could become violent.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Abidjan.  Embassy personnel are prohibited from driving outside the cities after dark, including between Abidjan, Grand Bassam, and Assinie. 

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Cote d’Ivoire.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Côte d’Ivoire has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Côte d’Ivoire: 

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.     
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Côte d’Ivoire.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Northern Border Region – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Extremists have carried out attacks in areas of Mali and Burkina Faso adjacent to Côte d’Ivoire and at an Ivoirian military border post in the town of Kafolo in June 2020.  Exercise increased caution and security procedures in remote areas adjacent to the northern border.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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48

Croatia

Exercise normal precautions in Croatia.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Croatia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Croatia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Croatia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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49

Cuba

Exercise increased caution in Cuba due to demonstrable and sometimes debilitating injuries to members of our diplomatic community resulting in the drawdown of embassy staff.

Country Summary: Numerous U.S. Embassy Havana employees suffered demonstrable and sometimes debilitating injuries during their service in Havana. Affected individuals have exhibited a range of physical symptoms including ear complaints and hearing loss, dizziness, headaches, fatigue, cognitive issues, visual problems, and difficulty sleeping. We continue to investigate how the health of our diplomats and their family members was severely and permanently damaged.  These symptoms occurred in U.S. diplomatic residences (including a long-term apartment at the Atlantic) and at Hotel Nacional and Hotel Capri in Havana.

The U.S. Embassy in Havana is operating with reduced staffing. Only family members employed by the Embassy may accompany U.S. government employees assigned to Cuba.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Cuba.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Cuba has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Cuba:

 Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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50

Curaçao

Exercise normal precautions in Curaçao.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Curaçao.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Curaçao has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Curacao:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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51

Cyprus

Exercise normal precautions in Cyprus. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Country Summary: Do not attempt to enter the United Nations buffer zone at any place other than a designated crossing point. Police and UN forces strictly enforce this restriction.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Cyprus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Cyprus has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Cyprus:

UN Buffer Zone: Since 1974, the southern part of Cyprus has been under the control of the government of the Republic of Cyprus. The northern part of Cyprus, administered by Turkish Cypriots, proclaimed itself the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (“TRNC”) in 1983. The United States does not recognize the “TRNC,” nor does any country other than Turkey. A buffer zone patrolled by the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, separates the two sides. For U.S. citizen travelers:

  • Enter and exit the Republic of Cyprus ONLY at Larnaca and Paphos airports and at the seaports of Limassol, Larnaca, and Paphos. The Republic of Cyprus does not consider entry at Ercan Airport in the north to be a “legal” entrance into Cyprus.
  • You cannot receive a residency permit from the Republic of Cyprus to reside in the area north of the UN buffer zone.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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52

Czech Republic

Exercise normal precautions in the Czech Republic.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Czech Republic.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Czech Republic has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the Czech Republic:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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53

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Reconsider travel to the Democratic Republic of Congo due to crime and civil unrest.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • North Kivu province due to crime, civil unrest, terrorism, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • Ituri province due to crime, civil unrest, terrorism, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • The eastern DRC region and the three Kasai provinces (Kasai, Kasai-Oriental, Kasai-Central) due to crime, civil unrest, armed conflict and kidnapping.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery, armed home invasion, and assault, is common and local police lack resources to respond effectively to serious crime. Assailants may pose as police or security agents.

Demonstrations are common in many cities and some have turned violent. Police have at times responded with heavy-handed tactics that resulted in civilian casualties and arrests.

The U.S. government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens outside of Kinshasa due to poor infrastructure and security conditions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Democratic Republic of Congo has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy's web page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Use caution when walking or driving.
  • Always have a copy of your U.S. passport and DRC visa.  Keep originals in a secure location.  Carry your U.S. passport and DRC visa when crossing provincial borders or flying domestically.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the DRC.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

North Kivu Province – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout North Kivu province. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Terrorist and armed groups operating in North Kivu province have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in North Kivu province as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ituri Province – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout Ituri province. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Terrorist and armed groups operating in Ituri province have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in Ituri province as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Eastern DRC Region and the Three Kasai Provinces – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout South Kivu, Tanganyika, Haut Lomami, Bas-Uele, and Haut-Uele and three Kasai provinces of Kasai Oriental, Kasai Central, and Kasai. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in eastern DRC and these provinces, as U.S. government travel to these regions is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to the health information.

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54

Denmark

Exercise increased caution in Denmark due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Denmark. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Denmark.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Denmark has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Denmark:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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55

Djibouti

Exercise increased caution in Djibouti due to terrorism and crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Djibouti has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, hospitals, and other public areas.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Djibouti:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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56

Dominica

Exercise normal precautions in Dominica.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Dominica.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Dominica has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Dominica:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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57

Dominican Republic

Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.

Country Summary:  Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault is a concern throughout the Dominican Republic. The development of a professional tourist police corps, institution of a 911 system in many parts of the country, and a concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas like Santo Domingo. The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality on the broader scale.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Dominican Republic.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Dominican Republic has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the Dominican Republic:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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58

Ecuador

Exercise increased caution in Ecuador due to crime.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Carchi, Sucumbíos, and the northern part of Esmeraldas provinces, including Esmeraldas city, due to crime.
  • Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue, due to crime.

Country Summary: Crime is a widespread problem in Ecuador. Violent crime, such as murder, assault, express kidnapping, and armed robbery, is common. Transnational criminal organizations and gangs operate in Carchi, Sucumbíos, and the northern part of Esmeraldas provinces, as well as in Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue.

Read the country information page for additional information on traveling to Ecuador.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ecuador has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Ecuador:

Carchi, Sucumbíos, and northern Esmeraldas Provinces – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Transnational crime groups operating in Esmeraldas province have engaged in violent crime and killed local citizens in addition to carrying out bombings targeting Ecuadorian military and law enforcement.

The U.S. government is limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Colombian border area, as U.S. government personnel cannot travel to the provinces of Esmeraldas, Carchi, and Sucumbíos without permission from the Embassy’s security office. However, U.S. government personnel are permitted to travel to the northern bank of the Napo River in Sucumbíos, an area approximately four miles wide, and the portion of Esmeraldas province that is south of Esmeraldas city.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Transnational crime groups and local gangs operating in Guayaquil have carried out a series of violent crimes in the region south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue, to include several murders and targeted assassinations, armed robberies, and assaults. The U.S. government is limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Guayaquil south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue, as U.S. government personnel cannot travel to this area without permission from the Embassy’s security office.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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59

Egypt

Reconsider travel to Egypt due to terrorism. Exercise increased caution in Egypt due to the Embassy’s limited ability to assist dual national U.S.-Egyptian citizens who are arrested or detained.

Do not travel to:

  • The Sinai Peninsula (with the exception of travel to Sharm El-Sheikh by air) due to terrorism.
  • The Western Desert due to terrorism.
  • Egyptian border areas due to military zones.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Egypt. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, and have targeted diplomatic facilities, tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, western businesses, restaurants, resorts, and local government facilities. Terrorists have conducted attacks in urban areas, including in Cairo, despite the heavy security presence. Terrorists have targeted religious sites, to include mosques, churches, monasteries, and buses traveling to these locations.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Egypt, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Local law prohibits protesting or demonstrating without a permit. Being near anti-government protests can draw scrutiny from Egyptian police and security forces. U.S. citizens have been detained for participating in protests and for posting content on social media perceived as critical of Egypt or its allies.

The U.S. Embassy may have a limited ability to provide consular services to dual U.S.-Egyptian citizens. Egyptian law considers dual citizens to be Egyptian citizens.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Egypt.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Egypt has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Egypt:  

Sinai Peninsula – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The Sinai Peninsula remains a particularly dangerous area, with frequent attacks on security forces and civilians.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens anywhere in the Sinai Peninsula as U.S. government employees are not authorized to travel to these areas (with the exception of the beach resort of Sharm El-Sheikh; travel to Sharm El-Sheikh is only permitted by air).

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

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El Salvador

Reconsider travel to El Salvador due to crime.

Country Summary:  Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault are of concern throughout significant portions of the country. Although gang activity varies among departamentos (states) and municipios (municipalities), areas witnessing higher crime rates are often located in close proximity to lower crime areas, or must be crossed in moving between lower risk areas. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents, although the concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to El Salvador.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined El Salvador has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to El Salvador:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not walk outside after dark. Do not drive to unfamiliar and/or remote locations after dark.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Engage local guides certified by the national or local tourist authority when hiking in back country areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for El Salvador.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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