Travel Advisories
Issued by US Department of State

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Showing 81-100 of 212 items.
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81

Guyana

Reconsider travel to Guyana due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, including murder and armed robbery, is common, especially at night. Local police often lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Guyana.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Guyana has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Guyana:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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82

Haiti

Do not travel to Haiti due to kidnapping, crime, and civil unrestU.S. citizens should carefully consider the risks of traveling to, and remaining in, Haiti in light of the current security situation and infrastructure challenges.

Country Summary: Kidnapping is widespread and victims regularly include U.S. citizens.   Kidnappers may use sophisticated planning or take advantage of unplanned opportunities, and even convoys have been attacked.  Kidnapping cases often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings. Victim’s families have paid thousands of dollars to rescue their family members.   

Violent crime, such as armed robbery and carjacking, is common.  Travelers are sometimes followed and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. Robbers and carjackers also attack private vehicles stuck in heavy traffic congestion and often target lone drivers, particularly women.  As a result, the U.S. Embassy requires its personnel to use official transportation to and from the airport.

Protests, demonstrations, tire burning, and roadblocks are frequent, unpredictable, and can turn violent.  The U.S. government is extremely limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Haiti – assistance on site is available only from local authorities (Haitian National Police and ambulance services).  Local police generally lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

U.S. government personnel are discouraged from walking in Port-au-Prince and other neighborhoods. Only adult family members over the age of 18 are permitted to accompany U.S. government employees assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince. U.S. government personnel in Haiti are prohibited from:

  • Visiting establishments after dark without secure, on-site parking;
  • Using any kind of public transportation or taxis;
  • Visiting banks and using ATMs;
  • Driving at night;
  • Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • Visiting certain parts of the city at any time without prior approval and special security measures in place.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Haiti.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Haiti has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Haiti:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds. Do not attempt to drive through roadblocks.
  • Arrange airport transfers and hotels in advance, or have your host meet you upon arrival.
  • Do not provide personal information to unauthorized individuals (i.e. people without official uniforms or credentials) located in the immigration, customs, or other areas inside or near any airports.
  • If you are being followed as you leave the airport, drive to the nearest police station immediately.
  • Travel by vehicle to minimize walking in public.
  • Travel in groups of at least two people.
  • Always keep vehicle doors locked and windows closed when driving.
  • Exercise caution and alertness, especially when driving through markets and other traffic congested areas.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Purchase travel insurance and medical evacuation insurance ahead of time.
  • Review information on Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report on Haiti.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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83

Honduras

Reconsider travel to Honduras due to crime.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Gracias a Dios Department due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as homicide and armed robbery, is common. Violent gang activity, such as extortion, violent street crime, rape, and narcotics and human trafficking, is widespread. Local police and emergency services lack sufficient resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Honduras.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Honduras has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Honduras:

Gracias a Dios Department – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Gracias a Dios is an isolated area with high levels of criminal activity and drug trafficking. Infrastructure is weak, government services are limited, and police and military presence is scarce.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Gracias a Dios as U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to the area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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84

Hong Kong

Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws and COVID-19-related restrictions. Do not travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), Jilin province, and Shanghai municipality due to COVID-19-related restrictions, including the risk of parents and children being separated. Reconsider travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong SAR due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

On April 11, 2022, the Department ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and all family members from the Consulate General Shanghai consular district due to a surge in COVID-19 cases and the impact of restrictions related to the PRC’s response.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the PRC has a low level of COVID-19 and a high level of COVID-19 for Hong Kong. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

The zero-tolerance approach to COVID-19 by the PRC and Hong Kong governments severely impacts travel and access to public services. All travelers should prepare to quarantine at a government-designated location for a minimum of 14 days upon arrival. While in quarantine, health authorities will test travelers as often as daily for COVID-19 and will not permit travelers to leave their rooms. Travelers who test positive during this quarantine time will be transferred to a government-designated medical or quarantine facility. Standards of care, accommodations, testing, and treatments may differ considerably from standards in the United States. Even after completing quarantine on-arrival, travelers to the PRC and Hong Kong may face additional quarantines and mandatory testing as well as movement and access restrictions, including access to medical services and public transportation. In some cases, children in Hong Kong and the PRC who test positive have been separated from their parents and kept in isolation until they meet local hospital discharge requirements.

Travelers within the PRC and Hong Kong may be subject to mandatory testing. In areas with confirmed COVID-19 cases, restrictions may include being confined to home or moved to a government- designated quarantine facility or hospital. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in the PRC, or the Consulate General Hong Kong's COVID-19 page for information on the COVID-19 situation in Hong Kong as testing and travel requirements frequently change.

Country Summary: The PRC government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including carrying out arbitrary and wrongful detentions and using exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries without due process of law. The PRC government uses arbitrary detention and exit bans to:

  • compel individuals to participate in PRC government investigations,
  • pressure family members to return to the PRC from abroad,
  • influence PRC authorities to resolve civil disputes in favor of PRC citizens, and
  • gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments.

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of an exit ban when they attempt to depart the PRC, and there is no reliable mechanism or legal process to find out how long the ban might continue or to contest it in a court of law.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.

Foreigners in the PRC, including but not limited to businesspeople, former foreign government personnel, and journalists from Western countries have been arbitrarily interrogated and detained by PRC officials for alleged violations of PRC national security laws. The PRC has also threatened, interrogated, detained, and expelled U.S. citizens living and working in the PRC.

Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC government.

The PRC government does not recognize dual nationality. U.S.-PRC citizens and U.S. citizens of Chinese heritage may be subject to additional scrutiny and harassment, and the PRC government may prevent the U.S. Embassy from providing consular services.

XINJIANG UYGHUR AUTONOMOUS REGION and TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice.

HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

Since the imposition of the National Security Law on June 30, 2020, the PRC unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power in the Hong Kong SAR. The PRC has demonstrated an intention to use this authority to target a broad range of activities it defines as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign entities. The National Security Law also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, which could subject U.S. citizens who have been publicly critical of the PRC to a heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution. PRC security forces, including the new Office for Safeguarding National Security, now operate in the Hong Kong SAR and are not subject to oversight by the Hong Kong judiciary.

Demonstrations: Participating in demonstrations or any other activities that authorities interpret as constituting an act of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion with a foreign country could result in criminal charges. On June 30, 2020, as part of its color-coded system of warning flags, the Hong Kong police unveiled a new purple flag, which warns protesters that shouting slogans or carrying banners with an intent prohibited by the law could now bring criminal charges. U.S. citizens are strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations.

Propaganda: A PRC propaganda campaign has falsely accused individuals, including U.S. citizens, of fomenting unrest in the Hong Kong SAR. In some cases, the campaign has published their personal information, resulting in threats of violence on social media.

Read the country information page for the PRC and the country information page for the Hong Kong SAR for additional information on travel.

If you decide to travel to the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, read the Embassy COVID-19 page for the PRC and the Consulate General COVID-19 page for the Hong Kong SAR for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, monitor local media, local transportations sites and apps like MTR Mobile or CitybusNWFB, and the Hong Kong International Airport website for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Avoid taking photographs of protesters or police without permission.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, review your Hong Kong flight status with your airline or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Enter the PRC on your U.S. passport with a valid PRC visa and keep it with you.
  • If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or the nearest consulate immediately.
  • If you plan to enter North Korea, read the North Korea Travel Advisory. Travelers should note that U.S. passports are not valid for travel to, in, or through North Korea, unless they are specially validated by the Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. Follow the U.S. Embassy on Twitter, WeChat, and Weibo. Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the PRC and the Hong Kong SAR.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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85

Hungary

Exercise normal precautions in Hungary.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Hungary.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Hungary has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Hungary:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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86

Iceland

Exercise normal precautions in Iceland.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iceland.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Iceland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Iceland: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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87

India

Exercise increased caution in India due to crime and terrorism.

Do not travel to:

  • The union territory of Jammu and Kashmir (except the eastern Ladakh region and its capital, Leh) due to terrorism and civil unrest.
  • Within 10 km of the India-Pakistan border due to the potential for armed conflict.

Country Summary: Indian authorities report rape is one of the fastest growing crimes in India. Violent crime, such as sexual assault, has occurred at tourist sites and in other locations.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and government facilities.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in rural areas from eastern Maharashtra and northern Telangana through western West Bengal as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to India.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined India has a low level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to India:

Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist attacks and violent civil unrest are possible in the union territory of Jammu and Kashmir. Avoid all travel to this state (with the exception of visits to the eastern Ladakh region and its capital, Leh). Sporadic violence occurs particularly along the Line of Control (LOC) separating India and Pakistan, and in tourist destinations in the Kashmir Valley: Srinagar, Gulmarg, and Pahalgam. The Indian government prohibits foreign tourists from visiting certain areas along the LOC.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

India-Pakistan Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel

India and Pakistan maintain a strong military presence on both sides of the border. The only official India-Pakistan border crossing point for persons who are not citizens of India or Pakistan is in the state of Punjab between Attari, India, and Wagah, Pakistan. The border crossing is usually open but confirm the current status of the border crossing prior to commencing travel. A Pakistani visa is required to enter Pakistan. Only U.S. citizens residing in India may apply for a Pakistani visa in India. Otherwise apply for a Pakistani visa in your country of residence before traveling to India.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Northeastern States – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Incidents of violence by ethnic insurgent groups, including bombings of buses, trains, rail lines, and markets, occur occasionally in the northeast.

U.S. government employees at the U.S. Embassy and Consulates in India are prohibited from traveling to the states of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Tripura, and Manipur without special authorization from the U.S. Consulate General in Kolkata.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Central and East India – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Maoist extremist groups, or “Naxalites,” are active in a large swath of India from eastern Maharashtra and northern Telangana through western West Bengal, particularly in rural parts of Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand and on the borders of Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, and Odisha. The Naxalites have conducted frequent terrorist attacks on local police, paramilitary forces, and government officials.

Due to the fluid nature of the threat, all U.S. government travelers to states with Naxalite activity must receive special authorization from the U.S. consulate responsible for the area to be visited. U.S. officials traveling only to the capital cities in these states do not need prior authorization.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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88

Indonesia

Exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to terrorism and natural disasters. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Central Sulawesi and Papua due to civil unrest.

Terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in Indonesia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting police stations, places of worship, hotels, bars, nightclubs, markets/shopping malls, and restaurants.

Natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis or volcano eruptions may result in disruptions to transportation, infrastructure, sanitation, and the availability of health services.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Indonesia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Indonesia has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Indonesia:

Central Sulawesi and Papua – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

In Central Sulawesi and Papua, violent demonstrations and conflict could result in injury or death to U.S. citizens. Avoid demonstrations and crowds.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Central Sulawesi and Papua as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to those areas.

  • Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.
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89

Iran

Do not travel to Iran due to the risk of kidnapping and the arbitrary arrest and detention of U.S. citizens.  

Country Summary: U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Iran have been kidnapped, arrested, and detained on spurious charges. Iranian authorities continue to unjustly detain and imprison U.S. citizens, particularly dual national Iranian-Americans--including students, journalists, business travelers, and academics--on charges including espionage and posing a threat to national security. Iranian authorities routinely delay consular access to detained U.S. citizens and consistently deny consular access to dual U.S.-Iranian citizens.

The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Iran.

Due to the risks of operating civilian aircraft within or in the vicinity of Iran, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iran.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Iran has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you are currently in Iran:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the COVID-19 page for the U.S. Virtual Embassy in Iran for country-specific COVID-19 information.    
  • Consider the risks involved in possessing dual U.S. Iranian nationality.
  • Review your personal security plan and visit our website for Travel to High Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Have a plan for departing Iran that does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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90

Iraq

Do not travel to Iraq due to terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict, civil unrest, and Mission Iraq’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

Country Summary: U.S. citizens in Iraq are at high risk for violence and kidnapping. Terrorist and insurgent groups regularly attack both Iraqi security forces and civilians. Anti-U.S. sectarian militias threaten U.S. citizens and Western companies throughout Iraq. Attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) occur in many areas of the country, including Baghdad.

Demonstrations, protests, and strikes occur frequently. These events can develop quickly without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent.

Public consular services at the Embassy remain suspended until further notice as a result of terrorist attacks on the Embassy compound on December 31, 2019. U.S. Consulate General Erbil remains open for routine American Citizens Services but is only able to provide limited appointments for nonimmigrant visa interviews.

On March 25, 2020, the Department of State ordered the departure of designated U.S. government employees from the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center due to security conditions and restricted travel options as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to security concerns, U.S. Embassy personnel in Baghdad are instructed to not use Baghdad International Airport.

U.S. citizens should not travel through Iraq to Syria to engage in armed conflict, where they would face extreme personal risks (kidnapping, injury, or death) and legal risks (arrest, fines, and expulsion). The Kurdistan Regional Government stated that it will impose prison sentences of up to ten years on individuals who illegally cross the border. Additionally, fighting on behalf of, or supporting designated terrorist organizations, is a crime that can result in penalties, including prison time and large fines in the United States.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Iraq, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iraq.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Iraq has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Iraq:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy's web page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook  and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Iraq.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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91

Ireland

Exercise normal precautions in Ireland.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Ireland.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ireland has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Ireland:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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92

Israel, The West Bank and Gaza

Exercise increased caution in Israel due to terrorism and civil unrest.  

Exercise increased caution when traveling to the West Bank due to terrorism and civil unrest

Do not travel to Gaza due to terrorism, civil unrest, and armed conflict.

Some areas have increased risk. Read the country information page and this entire Travel Advisory.   

Terrorist groups and lone-wolf terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Violence can occur in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza without warning. There has been a marked increase in demonstrations throughout Israel, some with little or no warning.   

West Bank: U.S. government travel throughout the West Bank is limited. Visit our website for Travel to High Risk Areas.  

Gaza:  The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Gaza as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling there and are restricted from traveling close to the Gaza demarcation line.  Hamas, a U.S. government-designated foreign terrorist organization, controls the security infrastructure in Gaza. The security environment within Gaza and on its borders is dangerous and volatile. Sporadic mortar or rocket fire and corresponding Israeli military responses may occur at any time. During periods of unrest or armed conflict, the crossings between Gaza with Israel and Egypt may be closed. 

Visit our website for Travel to High Risk Areas

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza have unknown levels of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Israel and/or the West Bank: 

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country specific information.
  • Have a plan to depart Israel and the West Bank, which does not rely on U.S. government assistance. 
  • Carry additional supplies of necessary medication in carry-on luggage due to quarantine restrictions.  
  • Check the most recent Alerts at the Embassy website for the latest information on travel in all of these areas.  
  • Maintain a high degree of situational awareness and exercise caution at all times, especially at checkpoints and other areas with a significant presence of security forces. 
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds. 
  • Follow the instructions of security and emergency response officials. 
  • Beware of and report suspicious activities, including unattended items, to local police. 
  • Learn the location of the nearest bomb shelter or other hardened shelter. Download the Home Front Command Red Alert application for mobile devices to receive real time alerts for rocket attacks.   
  • Obtain comprehensive travel medical insurance that includes medical evacuation prior to travel. Most travel insurance packages do not cover mental health related illnesses/care.  
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. 
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
  • Review the Country Security Report for Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza.  
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

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93

Italy

Exercise increased caution due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Italy. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Italy.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Italy has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Italy:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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94

Jamaica

Reconsider travel to Jamaica due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory. 

Do Not Travel to:

  • The below-listed areas of Clarendon Parish due to crime.
  • The below-listed areas of Hanover Parish due to crime.
  • The below-listed areas of Kingston and St. Andrew Parish due to crime.
  • The below-listed areas of Montego Bay due to crime.
  • The below-listed areas of St. Ann Parish due to crime.
  • The below-listed areas of St. Catherine Parish due to crime.
  • The below-listed areas of St. James Parish due to crime.
  • The below-listed area of Westmoreland Parish due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as home invasions, armed robberies, sexual assaults, and homicides, are common. Sexual assaults occur frequently, including at all-inclusive resorts. Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents. Emergency services vary throughout the island, and response times may vary from U.S. standards. The homicide rate reported by the Government of Jamaica has for several years been among the highest in the Western Hemisphere. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling to areas listed below, from using public buses, and from driving outside of prescribed areas of Kingston at night.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Jamaica.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Jamaica has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Jamaica:

Areas of Clarendon Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of Clarendon Parish. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • All of Clarendon Parish, except passing through Clarendon Parish using the T1 and A2 highways.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of Hanover Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of Hanover Parish. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • Logwood and Orange Bay

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of Kingston and St. Andrew Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of Kingston. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • Cassava Piece
  • Downtown Kingston, defined as between Mountain View Avenue and Hagley Park Road, and south of Half Way Tree and Old Hope Roads. Downtown Kingston includes Arnett Gardens, Cockburn Gardens, Denham Town, Olympic Gardens, Seaview Gardens, Trench Town, and Tivoli Gardens.
  • Duhaney Park
  • Grants Pen
  • Standpipe
  • Swallowfield
  • Elleston Flats
  • August Town

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of Montego Bay – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of Montego Bay. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • Canterbury
  • Flankers
  • Glendevon
  • Mount Salem
  • Norwood
  • Paradise Heights
  • Rose Heights

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of St. Ann Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of St. Ann Parish. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • Steer Town

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of St. Catherine Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of St. Catherine Parish. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • Spanish Town
  • Central Village
  • Certain areas within Portmore to include: Naggo Head, New Land, Old Braeton, and Waterford

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of St. James Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

  • Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of St. James Parish. Do not travel to the following areas:
  • Cambridge
  • Springmount
  • Johns Hall

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas of Westmoreland Parish – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violence and shootings occur regularly in some areas of Westmoreland Parish. Do not travel to the following areas:

  • Russia community in Savanna-la-Mar (The Southeastern quadrant of Savannah la Mar east of Darling Street and south of the A2 highway/Barracks Road)
  • The Whitehall neighborhood of east Negril

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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Japan

Reconsider travel to Japan due to COVID-19-related entry restrictions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Japan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Japan has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Japan.

If you decide to travel to Japan:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Discuss travel to Japan with your healthcare provider. Older adults and travelers with underlying health issues may be at risk for more severe disease.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Follow Embassy Tokyo’s American Citizen Services section on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Japan
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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Jordan

Exercise increased caution in Jordan due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Within 3.5 km of the Jordanian border with Syria and east of the town of Ruwayshid in the direction of the border with Iraq due to terrorism and armed conflict.
  • Designated Syrian refugee camps in Jordan due to Government of Jordan restrictions on entry into these camps.
  • Zarqa, Rusayfah, and the Baqa’a neighborhood of Ayn Basha due to terrorism and crime.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Ma’an City and as-Salt due to terrorism and crime.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue to plot possible attacks in Jordan. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Jordan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Jordan has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Jordan:

The Border with Syria and Iraq – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Jordan's border with Syria and Iraq given the continued threat of cross-border violence, including the risk of terrorist attacks.

All U.S. government personnel must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions for all official travel within 3.5 km of the Jordan-Syria border, and all travel must occur during day light hours only.  U.S. government personnel must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions for official travel east of the town of Ruwayshid towards the Iraq border, and all travel must occur during daylight hours only.

Personal travel by U.S. government employees to these border areas is not authorized.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Refugee Camps – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Syrian refugee camps in Jordan due to Government of Jordan restrictions on entry into these camps.

All U.S. government personnel on official travel to the four designated Syrian refugee camps listed below (formerly all refugee camps in Jordan) must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions.

  • Azraq Syrian Refugee Camp, Azraq, Zarqa
  • Za’atari Syrian Refugee Camp, Al Zatryah, Mafraq
  • King Abdullah Park Syrian Refugee Camp, Ramtha, Irbid
  • Emirati Jordanian Syrian Refugee Camp (Murijep al Fhoud), Al Jadedah, Zarqa

Personal travel by U.S. government personnel to these refugee camps is not authorized. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Zarqa, Rusayfah, and the Baqa’a Neighborhood of Ayn Basha – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Zarqa, Rusayfah and the Baqa’a neighborhood of Ayn Basha due to terrorism and crime.

All U.S. government personnel on official travel to Zarqa, Rusayfah and the Baqa’a neighborhood of Ayn Basha must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions, and all travel must occur during daylight hours only.  U.S. government personnel may transit through these cities on major highways during daylight hours only.

Personal travel by U.S. government personnel to these cities is not authorized.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ma’an and as-Salt – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Ma’an and as-Salt due to terrorism and crime.

All U.S. government personnel on official travel to Ma’an and as-Salt must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions. U.S. government personnel on official travel may transit through these cities on major highways outside of daylight hours.

Personal travel by U.S. government personnel to these cities is permitted during daylight hours only, with the exception of direct transit through these cities, which may also occur during hours of darkness.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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Kazakhstan

Exercise increased caution in Kazakhstan due to the possibility of civil unrest.

Country Summary: Demonstrations, protests, and strikes may occur. These events can develop quickly and without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, communication, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent. U.S. citizens in Kazakhstan should be aware that such protests may impact the U.S. Embassy’s ability to provide consular services, including assistance to U.S. citizens departing Kazakhstan.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Kazakhstan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kazakhstan has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Kazakhstan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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Kenya

Exercise increased caution in Kenya due to crime, terrorism, and kidnapping.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • Kenya-Somalia border and some coastal areas due to terrorism.
  • Areas of Turkana County due to crime.

Reconsider Travel to:

  • Nairobi neighborhoods of Eastleigh and Kibera at all times due to crime and kidnapping.  Be especially careful when traveling after dark anywhere in Kenya due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed carjacking, mugging, home invasion, and kidnapping, can occur at any time.  Local police are willing but often lack the capability to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents and terrorist attacks.  Emergency medical and fire service is also limited.

Terrorist attacks have occurred with little or no warning, targeting Kenyan and foreign government facilities, tourist locations, transportation hubs, hotels, resorts, markets/shopping malls, and places of worship.  Terrorist acts have included armed assaults, suicide operations, bomb/grenade attacks, and kidnappings.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating in the vicinity of the Kenyan-Somali border, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM).  For more information, U.S. citizens should consult Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Some schools and other facilities acting as cultural rehabilitation centers are operating in Kenya with inadequate or nonexistent licensing and oversight.  Reports of minors and young adults being held in these facilities against their wills and physically abused are common.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Kenya.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kenya has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Kenya:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa (if applicable). Keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Kenya.

Kenya-Somalia Border Counties and Coastal Areas – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Due to terrorism concerns, U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling to the Kenya-Somalia border counties and some coastal areas.

Kenya-Somalia Border Counties – Level 4: Do Not Travel

  • Mandera
  • Wajir
  • Garissa

Coastal Areas – Level 4: Do Not Travel

  • Tana River county
  • Lamu county
  • Areas of Kilifi County north of Malindi

Turkana County – Level 4: Do Not Travel

  • Road from Kainuk to Lodwar due to banditry

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nairobi neighborhoods of Eastleigh and Kibera – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Violent crime, such as armed carjacking, mugging, home invasion, and kidnapping, can occur at any time.  Street crime can involve multiple armed assailants.  Local police often lack the resources and training to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

Consider carefully whether to use the Likoni ferry in Mombasa due to safety concerns.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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Kiribati

Reconsider travel to Kiribati due to COVID-19-related restrictions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Kiribati.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kiribati has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel Commercial transportation to/from Kiribati is not available or only sporadically available.  It may be difficult to enter or leave Kiribati and travelers should expect delays entering Kiribati and/or returning to the United States. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Kiribati

If you decide to travel to Kiribati:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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Kosovo

Exercise increased caution due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • North Mitrovica, Leposavic, Zubin Potok, and Zvecan due to the potential for civil unrest due to ethnic tensions.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in the Balkans region, including Kosovo. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Kosovo.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kosovo has a low level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Kosovo:

North Mitrovica, Leposavic, Zubin Potok, and Zvecan – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Tensions within and between communities in northern Kosovo remain a source of potential unrest in North Mitrovica, Leposavic, Zubin Potok, and Zvecan.

Although recent unrest has been politically-related and does not involve tourists or members of the international community, bystanders can be affected.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in northern Kosovo as U.S. government employee travel to North Mitrovica, Leposavic, Zubin Potok, and Zvecan is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

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