Travel Advisories
Issued by US Department of State

US Department of State logo

Showing 101-120 of 210 items.
#DescriptionLevel
 
101

Kuwait

Do not travel to Kuwait due to COVID-19. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Kuwait due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Kuwait. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Kuwait.

Do not travel to:

  • The desert region near the border with Iraq due to the prevalence of unexploded ordnance.

Exercise increased caution:

  • The Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh area in Kuwait City due to crime.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Kuwait, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Kuwait:

Desert Region North of the Mutla’a Ridge and Near the Border with Iraq

Desert areas and certain beaches north of the Mutla’a Ridge continue to contain unexploded ordnance left over from the 1990-1991 Gulf War. Travelers should avoid areas that are “off the beaten path” and avoid touching objects that are potentially unexploded ordnance.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh

The Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior has identified the neighborhood of Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh on the outskirts of Kuwait International Airport as a high-crime area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
102

Kyrgyzstan

Reconsider travel to Kyrgyzstan due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Kyrgyzstan due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Kyrgyzstan.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Kyrgyz Republic:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
103

Laos

Do not travel to Laos due to COVID-19-related restrictions. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Laos for COVID-19, indicating a low level of COVID-19 in the country. Commercial transportation to/from Laos is available on a limited basis. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Laos.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Xaisomboun Province due to civil unrest.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Remote areas along the border with Burma due to crime.
  • Areas of Savannakhet, Xieng Khouang, Saravane, Khammouane, Sekong, Champassak, Houaphan, Attapeu, Luang Prabang, and Vientiane provinces, as well as along Route 7 (from Route 13 to the Vietnam border), Route 9 (Savannakhet to the Vietnam border), and Route 20 (Pakse to Saravane) due to unexploded bombs.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Laos:

Xaisomboun Province

There is a continued threat of violence in Xaisomboun Province. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Xiasomboun Province as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel there.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas on the Border with Burma

Bandits, drug traffickers, and other people pursuing illegal activities operate in these areas, as do armed groups opposed to the Burmese government.

Areas Savannakhet, Xieng Khouang, Saravane, Khammouane, Sekong, Champassak, Houaphan, Attapeu, Luang Prabang, and Vientiane provinces, as well as along Route 7.

There are large numbers of unexploded bombs in these areas left over from the Indochina War.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
104

Latvia

Do not travel to Latvia due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Latvia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Latvia. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Latvia,  

Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Latvia.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Latvia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
105

Lebanon

Do not travel to Lebanon due to COVID-19. Reconsider travel to Lebanon due to crime, terrorism, armed conflict, civil unrest, kidnapping and Embassy Beirut’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Lebanon due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Lebanon.

Do Not Travel to:

  • the border with Syria due to terrorism and armed conflict
  • the border with Israel due to the potential for armed conflict
  • refugee settlements due to the potential for armed clashes

Local security authorities have noted a recent rise in violent crimes, including political violence. Multiple unsolved killings within the past 12 months in Lebanon may have been politically motivated. U.S. citizens living and working anywhere in Lebanon should be aware of the risks of remaining in the country and review their personal security plans.

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Lebanon should be aware that consular officers from the U.S. Embassy are not always able to travel to assist them. The Department of State considers the threat to U.S. government personnel in Beirut sufficiently serious to require them to live and work under strict security. Movements have been limited further by health and safety precautions related to COVID-19. The internal security policies of the U.S. Embassy may be adjusted at any time and without advance notice.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Lebanon. Terrorists may conduct attacks with little or no warning targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

The Lebanese government cannot guarantee the protection of U.S. citizens against sudden outbreaks of violence. Family, neighborhood, or sectarian disputes can escalate quickly and can lead to gunfire or other violence with no warning. Armed clashes have occurred along the borders, in Beirut, and in refugee settlements. The Lebanese Armed Forces have been brought in to quell the violence in these situations.

There are frequent demonstrations in Lebanon. U.S. citizens should avoid demonstrations and exercise caution if in the vicinity of any large gatherings or protests as some of these have turned violent. Protesters have blocked major roads, including thoroughfares between downtown Beirut and the area where the U.S. Embassy is located, and between Beirut and Rafiq Hariri International Airport.

Kidnapping, whether for ransom, political motives, or family disputes, has occurred in Lebanon. Suspects in kidnappings may have ties to terrorist or criminal organizations.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Lebanon:

Border with Syria – Do Not Travel

Starting in August 2014, Lebanon witnessed deadly terror attacks in border towns along Lebanon’s border with Syria, including episodic clashes between the Lebanese Army and Syrian-based violent extremist groups. A 2017 Lebanese Army offensive expelled ISIS militants from territory along Lebanon’s border with Syria. The U.S. Embassy strongly urges U.S. citizens to avoid the Lebanese-Syrian border region. The U.S. Department of State also warns U.S. citizens of the risk of traveling on flights that fly over Syria, which include some flights to and from Beirut.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Border with Israel – Do Not Travel

There have been sporadic rocket attacks from southern Lebanon into Israel in connection with the violence between Israel and Hizballah, most recently in September 2019. The U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to avoid this border area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Refugee Settlements – Do Not Travel

The U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to avoid travel to refugee settlements, which are prone to outbreaks of violence including shootings and explosions.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
106

Lesotho

Do not travel to Lesotho due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Lesotho due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Lesotho currently bans most U.S. citizens from entering due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Lesotho. 

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Lesotho:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
107

Liberia

Exercise increased caution in Liberia due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Liberia due to COVID-19, indicating a low level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Liberia. 

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, is common, particularly in urban areas and on public beaches. Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crimes.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside greater Monrovia at night as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling outside the capital or between counties after dark (with the exception of travel to and from Roberts International Airport).

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Liberia:

 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
108

Libya

Do not travel to Libya due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Libya due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the State Department’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Libya. 

Crime levels in Libya remain high, including the threat of kidnapping for ransom. Westerners and U.S. citizens have been targets of these crimes.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Libya. Violent extremist activity in Libya remains high, and extremist groups have made threats against U.S. government officials and citizens. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, hotels, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and government facilities.

Outbreaks of violence between competing armed groups can occur with little warning and have the potential to impact U.S. citizens. The capital, Tripoli, and other cities, such as Surman, Al-Jufra, Misrata, Ajdabiya, Benghazi, Sabha, and Dernah, have witnessed fighting among armed groups, as well as terrorist attacks. Hotels and airports frequented by Westerners have been the targets of these attacks. Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence.

Militia or armed groups sometimes detain travelers for arbitrary reasons, do not grant detainees access to a lawyer or a legal process, and do not allow detainees to inform others of their status. U.S. citizens should carry proof of citizenship and valid immigration status at all times, but having these documents does not guarantee fair treatment.

Some international and national airports are closed, and flights out of operational airports are sporadic and may be cancelled without warning. The U.S. government is very concerned about the targeting of commercial transportation in Libya and prohibits U.S. commercial aviation operations within Libyan airspace.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency or routine assistance to U.S. citizens in Libya, as the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli suspended its operations in July 2014.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Libya, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Libya:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s webpage regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Carry proof of citizenship and valid immigration status at all times.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Make contingency plans to leave.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or a power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, and etcetera.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

US Department of State logo
109

Liechtenstein

Do not travel to Liechtenstein due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Liechtenstein due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in country. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Liechtenstein.

Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Liechtenstein.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Liechtenstein:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
110

Lithuania

Do not travel to Lithuania due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Lithuania due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Lithuania. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Lithuania.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Lithuania:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
111

Luxembourg

Do not travel to Luxembourg due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Luxembourg due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Luxembourg. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry in Luxembourg.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Luxembourg:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
112

Macau

Do not travel to Macau due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Macau due to COVID-19, indicating an unknown level of COVID-19 in Macau. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Macau. Visit the Consulate General's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Macau.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Macau:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
113

Madagascar

Do not travel to Madagascar due to COVID-19.  Exercise increased caution in Madagascar due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Madagascar due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Madagascar currently bans [all/most] U.S. citizens from entering due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Madagascar.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery and assault, may occur throughout Madagascar and particularly in:

  • Antananarivo, Nosy Be, Toamasina (Tamatave), and Mahajunga
  • Ankarana and Montagne d’Ambre National Parks adjacent to Diego
  • Isalo
  • General area surrounding Tolagnaro (Ft. Dauphin), south of National Route (RN) 7 and RN 27 (excluding the tourist area on the coastal roads between Ambovombe and Farafangana)
  • Batterie Beach, north of Toliara (Tuléar)

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Madagascar:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
114

Malawi

Reconsider travel to Malawi due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Malawi due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Malawi.  

Read the country information page.  

If you decide to travel to Malawi:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
115

Malaysia

Do Not travel to Malaysia due to COVID-19. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Malaysia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Malaysia. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Malaysia.  

Exercise Increased Caution in:

  • The eastern area of Sabah State due to kidnapping.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Malaysia:

Eastern Area of Sabah State

There is a threat of kidnappings-for-ransom from both terrorist and criminal groups. These groups may attack with little to no warning, targeting coastal resorts, island resorts, and boats ferrying tourists to resort islands.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in eastern Sabah as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to parts of eastern Sabah.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
116

Maldives

Do not travel to Maldives due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Maldives due to terrorism.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Maldives due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Maldives.

Terrorist groups may conduct attacks with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Attacks may occur on remote islands which could lengthen the response time of authorities.  

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Maldives:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
117

Mali

Do not travel to Mali due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, and kidnapping.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Mali due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Mali.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as kidnapping and armed robbery, is common in Mali. Violent crime is a particular concern during local holidays and seasonal events in Bamako, its suburbs, and Mali’s southern regions. Roadblocks and random police checkpoints are commonplace throughout the country, especially at night.

Terrorist and armed groups continue plotting kidnappings and attacks in Mali. They may attack with little or no warning, targeting night clubs, hotels, restaurants, places of worship, Western diplomatic missions, and other locations frequented by foreigners.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens throughout much of the country of Mali as U.S. government employee travel outside Bamako is restricted due to security concerns.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Mali, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Mali:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will, and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  •          Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify whom you would contact first and how they should share the information.
  • Identify key sources of possible assistance for you and your family in case of emergency, such as the local U.S. embassy or consulate, FBI, the State Department, your employer (if traveling on business), and local friends/family in the high-risk area.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones so that, if you are taken hostage, your loved ones will know specific questions and answers to ask the hostage-takers to be sure you are alive and to rule out a hoax.
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Guard your passport and wallet when in crowded outdoor areas and open-air markets.
  • Be vigilant for pickpockets, especially at night.
  • Use all available safety measures in your home or hotel, including locking doors and windows at all times, and setting the alarm.
  • If asked to stop by police, stop only in well-lit areas or places where several officers are posted.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Mali.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
118

Malta

Do not travel to Malta due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Malta due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Malta. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Malta.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Malta:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
119

Marshall Islands

Reconsider travel to the Marshall Islands due to COVID-19-related travel restrictions.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for the Marshall Islands for COVID-19, indicating a low level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into the Marshall Islands. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the Marshall Islands.  

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Marshall Islands:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
120

Mauritania

Exercise increased caution in Mauritania due to COVID-19, crime and terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Mauritania due to COVID-19, indicating a moderate level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Mauritania.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Areas designated as off limits by the Mauritanian military due to crime and terrorism.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as mugging, armed robbery, and assault, are common. Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crimes.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting places frequented by Westerners.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Mauritania as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside Nouakchott. U.S. government employees may travel only during daylight hours and are prohibited from walking alone outside of designated areas and times.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Mauritania:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's webpage regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa (if applicable). Keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Mauritania.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Areas Designated Off-Limits by the Mauritanian Military – Do Not Travel

The government of Mauritania designates certain areas off-limits to foreigners and most Mauritanians. These “No Movement Zones” are extremely dangerous due to their proximity to Mali, where armed groups engaged in an active insurgency carry out cross-border attacks into Mauritania. The government of Mauritania does not maintain a substantial presence in these areas and thus police are unable to respond to most incidents there. In addition, cell phone coverage and paved roads are nonexistent. U.S. officials are unable to travel to these places. Since the boundaries of such areas frequently change, U.S. citizens should pay attention to all posted signs and notices of restricted entry. They should presume the following areas are off-limits:

  • All areas north of the Tropic of Cancer
  • All areas east of 08⁰ longitude (West of Greenwich) situated within 100km of the Mali Border

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo