Travel Advisories
Issued by US Department of State

US Department of State logo

Showing 161-180 of 210 items.
#DescriptionLevel
 
161

Sao Tome and Principe

Do Not Travel to Sao Tome and Principe due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Sao Tome and Principe due to COVID-19, indicating an unknown level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sao Tome and Principe.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sao Tome and Principe:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information

US Department of State logo
162

Saudi Arabia

Do not travel to Saudi Arabia due to COVID-19. Reconsider travel to Saudi Arabia due to the threat of missile and drone attacks on civilian facilities. Exercise increased caution in Saudi Arabia due to terrorism.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Saudi Arabia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Saudi Arabia. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia.

Do not travel to the following locations due to missile and drone attacks and terrorism:

  • Within 50 miles of the Saudi-Yemen border, as well as the cities of Abha, Jizan, Najran, and Khamis Mushayt;
  • Abha airport;
  • Qatif in the Eastern Province and its suburbs, including Awamiyah.

U.S. government personnel must adhere to the above travel restrictions. As such, the U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these locations.

Missile and drone attacks perpetrated by Iran and Iran-supported militant groups represent a significant threat. The Islamic Republic of Iran has supplied Yemen-based Houthis and other regional proxy groups with weapons to conduct destructive and sometimes lethal attacks using drones, missiles, and rockets against a variety of Saudi sites, including critical infrastructure, civilian airports, military bases, and energy facilities throughout the country, as well as vessels in Red Sea shipping lanes.  recent attacks were aimed at targets throughout Saudi Arabia including Riyadh, Jeddah, Dhahran, Jizan, Khamis Mushayt, the civilian airport in Abha, Al Kharj, military installations in the south, as well as oil and gas facilities.

Debris from intercepted drones and missiles represents a significant risk to civilian areas and populations.  Militant groups continue to plan and conduct attacks against locations in Saudi Arabia. U.S. citizens living and working near military bases and critical civilian infrastructure, particularly near the border with Yemen, are at heightened risk of missile, drone, and rocket attacks.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Saudi Arabia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Terrorists have targeted both Saudi and Western government interests, mosques and other religious sites (both Sunni and Shia), and places frequented by U.S. citizens and other Westerners.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Saudi Arabia, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Saudi Arabia:

Yemen Border, Abha airport, and Qatif in the Eastern Province and its suburbs, including Awamiyah:

Militant groups in Yemen have attacked Saudi border towns and other sites in Saudi Arabia with armed drones, missiles, and rockets. Civilians that are near the border with Yemen are especially at risk. Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Saudi Arabia, including in Qatif.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens within 50 miles of the Saudi-Yemen border as U.S. government personnel and their families are restricted from travel to this area.

Visit our website for information on travel to high-risk areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
163

Senegal

Reconsider travel to Senegal due to COVID-19. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 Travel Health Notice for Senegal due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Senegal.

Exercise Increased Caution In:

  • The Casamance region due to crime and landmines.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Senegal:

Casamance Region--Exercise Increased Caution

Armed individuals have set up roadblocks and attacked travelers on roads south of The Gambia in the Casamance region of Senegal.

Land mines from prior conflicts remain in the Casamance Region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in this area. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travelling on National Route 4 south of Ziguinchor, on Route 20 between Ziguinchor and Cap Skirring, and on unpaved roads without armed escorts. U.S. government employees are also prohibited from travelling after dark.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

US Department of State logo
164

Serbia

Do not travel to Serbia due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Serbia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in country.

Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Serbia.

Additionally, exercise increased caution in Serbia due to crime.

Violence associated with organized crime and high-profile sporting events in Serbia is common.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Serbia:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave the original in your hotel safe.
  • Provide your itinerary to a family member or friend.
  • Monitor local media.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Serbia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 and crime information.

US Department of State logo
165

Seychelles

Do not travel to Seychelles due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Seychelles due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Seychelles.

Read the Country Information page.

If you decide to travel to Seychelles:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
166

Sierra Leone

Reconsider travel to Sierra Leone due to crime. Exercise normal precautions due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Sierra Leone due to COVID-19, indicating a low level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sierra Leone.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as robbery and assault, occur frequently in Sierra Leone, especially in Freetown. Local police often lack the resources to deal effectively with serious criminal incidents.

If traveling outside the Freetown peninsula, make all efforts to complete your travel during daylight hours due to increased safety hazards at night.  The U.S. Embassy is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Freetown at night as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling outside the capital after dark.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sierra Leone:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa (if applicable). Keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Sierra Leone.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

US Department of State logo
167

Singapore

Exercise increased caution in Singapore due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 2 Travel Health Notice for Singapore due to COVID-19, indicating a moderate level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for details.  

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Singapore:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
168

Sint Maarten

Reconsider travel to Sint Maarten due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 Travel Health Notice for Sint Maarten due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Consulate's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sint Maarten.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sint Maarten:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
169

Slovakia

Do not travel to Slovakia due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Slovakia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for details. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Slovakia. 

Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Slovakia.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Slovakia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
170

Slovenia

Do not travel to Slovenia due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for the Slovenia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Slovenia. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Slovenia.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Slovenia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information

US Department of State logo
171

Solomon Islands

Do not travel to Solomon Islands due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Solomon Islands due to COVID-19, indicating an unknown level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place, including third-country transit requirements, affecting U.S. citizen entry and exit in Solomon Islands. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the Solomon Islands.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Solomon Islands:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
172

Somalia

Do not travel to Somalia due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, civil unrest, health issues, kidnapping, and piracy.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 4 Travel Health Notice for Somalia due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Somalia.

Violent crime, such as kidnapping and murder, is common throughout Somalia, including Puntland and Somaliland. Illegal roadblocks are also widespread. A number of schools acting as “cultural rehabilitation” facilities are operating throughout Somalia with unknown licensing and oversight.  Reports of physical abuse and people being held against their will in these facilities are common.

Terrorists continue to plot kidnappings, bombings, and other attacks in Somalia. They may conduct attacks with little or no warning, targeting airports and seaports, government buildings, hotels, restaurants, shopping areas, and other areas where large crowds gather and Westerners frequent, as well as government, military, and Western convoys. Methods of attack can include car bombs, suicide bombers, individual attackers, and mortar fire, among others.

Civil unrest occurs throughout Somalia and can sometimes be violent.

Medical facilities across Somalia have limited capacity and are often nonexistent in rural areas.

Pirates are active in the waters off the Horn of Africa, especially in the international waters near Somalia.

The U.S. government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Somalia due to the lack of permanent consular presence in Somalia.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Somalia, the Federal Aviation Administration has issued a Special Federal Aviation Regulation. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Somalia:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Review your personal security plan and visit our page on Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Avoid sailing near the coast of Somalia and review the Live Piracy Report published by the International Maritime Bureau.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization (if you are traveling on business) or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization (if you are traveling on business), so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify whom you would contact first, and how that person should share the information.
  • Identify key sources of possible assistance for you and your family in case of emergency, such as the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate, FBI, the State Department, your employer (if traveling on business), and local friends/family in the high-risk area.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and members of Congress if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Somalia.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
173

South Africa

Do not travel to South Africa due to COVID-19.  Exercise increased caution in South Africa due to crime and civil unrest.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for South Africa due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in South Africa.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, rape, carjacking, mugging, and "smash-and-grab" attacks on vehicles, is common. There is a higher risk of violent crime in the central business districts of major cities after dark.

Demonstrations, protests, and strikes occur frequently. These can develop quickly without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent.

Please see our Alerts for up-to-date information.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to South Africa:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
174

South Korea

Exercise increased caution in South Korea due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for South Korea due to COVID-19, indicating a moderate level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in South Korea, including a mandatory 14-day quarantine which remains in effect.  

If you decide to travel to South Korea:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
175

South Sudan

Do not travel to South Sudan due to COVID-19, crime, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for South Sudan due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in South Sudan.  

Violent crime, such as carjackings, shootings, ambushes, assaults, robberies, and kidnappings is common throughout South Sudan, including Juba. Foreign nationals have been the victims of rape, sexual assault, armed robberies, and other violent crimes.

Armed conflict is ongoing and includes fighting between various political and ethnic groups. Weapons are readily available to the population. In addition, cattle raids occur throughout the country and often lead to violence.

Reporting in South Sudan without the proper documentation from the South Sudanese Media Authority is considered illegal, and any journalistic work there is very dangerous. Journalists regularly report being harassed in South Sudan, and many have been killed while covering the conflict.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in South Sudan. U.S. government personnel in South Sudan are under a strict curfew. They must use armored vehicles for nearly all movements, and official travel outside Juba is limited. Due to the critical crime threat in Juba, walking is also restricted; when allowed, it is limited to a small area in the immediate vicinity of the Embassy and during daylight hours only. Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in South Sudan.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of South Sudan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.  

If you decide to travel to South Sudan:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Exercise extreme care in all parts of the country, including Juba. Travel outside of Juba with a minimum of two vehicles along with appropriate recovery and medical equipment in case of mechanical failure or other emergency.
  • Avoid travel along border areas.
  • Avoid demonstrations and public gatherings. Even events intended to be peaceful can become violent.
  • Be aware that photography in public is strictly controlled and you are required to obtain authorization from the Ministry of Information before taking any photographs or video in public – including while inside a vehicle.
  • Monitor local/international news and consular messages.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Review your personal security plan and visit our page on travel to high risk areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, log-in information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization. Your plan should include sheltering in place, maintaining outside communication, and a personal evacuation plan via commercial means.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for South Sudan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
176

Spain

Do not travel to Spain due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Spain due to terrorism and civil unrest.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Spain due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Spain. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Spain.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Spain. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Demonstrations are common. They may take place in response to political or economic issues, on politically significant holidays, and during international events.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Spain:

  • See the U.S. Embassy page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Spain.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to information regarding COVID19.                               

US Department of State logo
177

Sri Lanka

Reconsider Travel to Sri Lanka due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Sri Lanka due to terrorism

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Sri Lanka due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sri Lanka.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, hospitals, and other public areas.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote areas.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sri Lanka:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Sri Lanka.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
178

Sudan

Reconsider travel to Sudan due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Sudan due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sudan.  

Country Summary: Crime, such as kidnapping, armed robbery, home invasion, and carjacking can occur. This type of crime is more frequent outside of Khartoum.

Members of known terrorist groups and individuals sympathetic to these groups in Sudan could attack with little or no warning, targeting foreign and local government facilities, and areas frequented by Westerners.

Demonstrations can occur with no warning. The majority of recent demonstrations in Khartoum have been planned and peaceful. However, police and other security forces may intervene to disperse demonstrators, including with the use of tear gas when protests occur near key government locations and/or impair freedom of movement.

Violence continues along the border between Chad and Sudan and areas that border South Sudan (including the disputed Abyei area). Armed opposition groups are active in Central Darfur state and parts of Blue Nile and South Kordofan states. Intercommunal clashes can occur throughout the country and can result in the declaration of localized States of Emergency.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Khartoum, as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization from the Sudanese government to travel outside of Khartoum. The U.S. Embassy requires U.S. government personnel in Sudan to use armored vehicles for official travel.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sudan:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.    
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or a power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, and the like.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions and answers to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive and to rule out a hoax.
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Sudan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo
179

Suriname

Do not travel to Suriname due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Suriname due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Suriname currently bans most U.S. citizens from entering due to COVID-19. Commercial transportation to/from Suriname is not available or only sporadically available. It may be difficult to enter or leave Suriname and travelers should expect delays entering Suriname and/or returning to the United States. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Suriname.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Suriname:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

US Department of State logo
180

Sweden

Do not travel to Sweden due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for the Sweden due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sweden. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Sweden. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sweden.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sweden:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

US Department of State logo